Garcia’s Kitchen

Diner | New Mexican
Memorable
One of the best
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From the time Roadfooders extraordinaires Chris Ayers and Amy Breisch singled it out as a highlight of their epic Route 66 road trip in the summer of 2010, Garcia’s Kitchen was high on my hit list of alluring eateries in Albuquerque. It has been around since 1975 and there now are seven locations around the city. All are bright and festive, from Fiestaware dishes to colorful murals on inside and outside walls. All Garcia’s Kitchens serve breakfast any time.

Lucky me, my first breakfast was with three other hungries from the Roadfood tour and I was therefore able to savor lots of different things. Continue reading

From the time Roadfooders extraordinaires Chris Ayers and Amy Breisch singled it out as a highlight of their epic Route 66 road trip in the summer of 2010, Garcia’s Kitchen was high on my hit list of alluring eateries in Albuquerque. It has been around since 1975 and there now are seven locations around the city. All are bright and festive, from Fiestaware dishes to colorful murals on inside and outside walls. All Garcia’s Kitchens serve breakfast any time.

Lucky me, my first breakfast was with three other hungries from the Roadfood tour and I was therefore able to savor lots of different things. We ordered a mere 4-ounce bowl of chicharrones (you also can get them by the pint), which are a bacon-lover’s fantasy: nuggets of crisp fried pork that are about half-meat, half-fat – unbelievably delicious when eaten melt-in-the-mouth warm, still irresistible as we devoured the last of them at the end of the meal, appetite only a memory but taste buds still ravening. It was especially fun to tear off a piece of sopaipilla, insert a single chicharrone, then drizzle on some honey: sweet, wheat, and meat all in one!

Glorious carne adovada: hunks of pork saturated with sunny chile flavor and bathed in red puree – so much puree that the yolks of two fried eggs on the plate barely poke up through the chile. On the side come good fried potatoes and lard-rich refritos. Huevos rancheros is an equally overabundant plateful. You get your choice of red or green chile; say Christmas and you get both – two soupy brews that magically arrive perfectly separated on the plate, but then swirl together as soon as you attack with a fork. A huge breakfast burrito can be had similarly dressed, half-and-half.

Beyond breakfast, the menu includes such New Mexico signature dishes as blue corn enchiladas, green chile cheeseburgers and stuffed sopaipillas. There are Tex-Mex chili con carne and true-Mex menudo as well as a full array of burritos available “chili in,” “chili & cheese over” or “smothered.”

Dishes to try
Garcia’s Kitchen, Carne Adovada
Carne Adovada
Must-Try
As popular at breakfast as at supper, carne adovada spotlights the flavor of chile. Chunks of pork are saturated with it, and the whole plate is smothered with puree that is intensely flavored but not incendiary hot. When those half-hidden yolks were poked, they swirled deliciously with the chile.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Breakfast Burrito
Breakfast Burrito
Must-Try
Like so many New Mexican dishes, the breakfast burrito is offered with either red or green chile. If you want both, say 'Christmas,' and you get half and half.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Karnitas
Karnitas
Must-Try
Garcia's karnitas, which most other places spell carnitas, are strips of beef stewed with chile, tomatoes and onions. They are at the left of the plate, accompanied by eggs topped with green chile, refried beans and potatoes.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Huevos Rancheros
Huevos Rancheros
Must-Try
Huevos rancheros, 'ranch eggs,' is a big breakfast atop a wheat tortilla, here smothered with green and red chile and sided by fried potatoes and refried beans.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Chicharrones
Chicharrones
Must-Try
Chicharrones are little nuggets of fried pork rind -- like bacon squared or, in this case, cubed.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Sopaipillas (2)
Sopaipillas (2)
Must-Try
Breakfast comes with your choice of tortilla, toast or -- pictured here -- sopaipillas. Paul Bosland of NMSU's Chile Institute recently expressed his puzzlement at sopaipillas' etymology. Sopa means pillow and sopaipilla would mean little pillow, but apparently the word 'sopaipilla' -- like the dish -- is a New Mexican invention with no equivalent in Mexico or Spain.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Green Chile Stew
Green Chile Stew
Must-Try
Mild in heat, but bold in flavor, this bowl of green chile stew was an excellent way to start our dinner at Garcia's.
Garcia’s Kitchen, Agua Frescas
Agua Frescas
To drink, a couple of agua frescas. That's sandia on the left, melon on the right.
Directions and Hours
closed now
Sunday7am - 2pm
Monday7am - 3pm
Tuesday7am - 3pm
Wednesday7am - 3pm
Thursday7am - 3pm
Friday7am - 3pm
Saturday7am - 3pm
Roadtrips
This restaurant is featured in the following eating tours.
13 stops | 10 hr 12 min total driving
7 stops | 28 min total driving
7 stops | 12 hr 24 min total driving
9 stops | 15 hr 33 min total driving
12 stops | 6 hr 45 min total driving
Information and Policies
Seasons
Open Year Round
Meals Served
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Credit Cards Accepted
Yes
Alcohol Served
No
Outdoor Seating
No
Reservations Accepted
No
Delivery Available
No
Takeout Counter
Yes
Website