Driving Tour

21 MILES | 40 min | by Michael Stern

One day and a lot of appetite are the requirements for this eat-fest in Columbia, South Carolina. The city’s signature dish is a pimento cheeseburger, nowhere more magnificent than at the Kingsman. Columbia is barbecue nirvana, as evidenced at Big Boy’s Smokehouse. It’s also a great city in which to greet the morning — with superb coffee at Drip, artisan pastries at Rise Bakeshop, and cloud-light omelets and crisp hash browns at Ray’s Diner. Soul-food meat-and-three meals are a Ray’s specialty, too.

Driving Tour

120 MILES | 2 hr 6 min | by Michael Stern

A road trip over the Cascades through Snoqualmie Pass leads not only to a bucolic, big-sky Washington State and some of the most wonderful fruit stands (apples especially!), but also to memorable restaurants. First stop, before heading upwards, is Twede’s Cafe, made famous in the TV Show “Twin Peaks” for its cherry pie. Beyond the Stampede Pass, the town of Cle Elum (meaning swift water in Kittitas) is home to out-of-this-world maple bars and donuts at the Cle Elum Bakery and Seattle-class coffee at Pioneer Coffee Company. In Ellensburg, the adorable Yellow Church Cafe serves artisan meals with outstanding layer cakes for dessert; and finally, in Yakima, Miner’s Drive-In is a vintage joint with huge burgers, good fries, and glorious ultra-thick milk shakes.

Driving Tour

25 MILES | 1 hr 28 min | by Michael Stern

Forget the fine dining and not-so-fine dining that proliferates in the nation’s capital. These Roadfood restaurants will provide a true and delicious taste of DC. For breakfast, start with a soul-food feast at the Florida Avenue Grill or a simple and perfect breakfast sandwich at Universal Doughnuts. Lunch can be a grand fish plate at Horace & Dickie’s or the District of Columbia’s unique half-smoke sausage at Ben’s Chili Bowl or over in Arlington at Weenie Beenie. And do reserve appetite for one of the great deli meals anywhere at the artisan DGS Delicatessen.

Driving Tour

1 MILE | 5 min | by Michael Stern

There’s no neighborhood in America more appetite-friendly than Pittsburgh’s Strip. Groceries of every sort, restaurants of every continent, stand-up snacks and sit-down meals abound. It’s all within a few blocks, so park the car and take this walking tour of Roadfood classics that begins with outlandish pancakes at DeLuca’s and ends with mile-high dagwood sandwiches at the original 24/7 Primanti’s. Our favorite of all Strip eateries is Enrico Biscotti Company, not only for magnificent cookies and espresso, but for casual true-Italian lunch. And at some point during the stroll, it is essential to wander through the Disney-size grocery/seafood market/snack bar known as Robert Wholey & Co., famous for its magnificent one-pound fish sandwich.

Driving Tour

4 MILES | 15 min | by Michael Stern

South Tucson is surrounded by the city of Tucson, but legally and culturally – and edibly – it is a world unto itself, with more excellent Sonoran-style Mexican restaurants than anywhere else. Here are the two great sources of that most baroque American wiener, the Sonoran hot dog — El Guero Canelo and BK Carne Asada. Must-eats include green corn tamales at Los Jarritos, an Azteca quesadila at El Indio, and four-star tacos at Pico de Gallo. For donuts, apple fritters, and Mexican wedding cookies, Le Cave’s (since 1935) is the place to go.

Driving Tour

217 MILES | 4 hr 14 min | by Michael Stern

Skyline Drive, the 105-mile two-lane that threads through Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park, has decent food at its National Park Service Oases. (Try the Smithfield Ham Monte Cristo or the roast turkey with cornbread stuffing at Big Meadows Lodge at mile 51.2.) But when big appetite beckons, we head for one of the four entry/exit points and drive into the countryside for such Roadfood delights as apple butter donuts at The Apple House (near the Front Royal terminus) and vintage sliders at the Snow White Grill. The Thornton Gap exit leads to such Old Dominion classics as peanut soup at the Southern Kitchen and country ham at Fulks Run Grocery. A detour even farther east will yield gorgeous layer cake at the Orlean Market and blue-ribbon pastries of every sort at the Red Truck Rural Bakery. The southern end of Skyline Drive is near Staunton, Virginia, home of beauteous burgers at Wright’s Dairy Rite and the sprawling family favorite Mrs. Rowe’s. And about twenty minutes east is extraordinary pizza and hot milk cake at Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie.

Driving Tour

71 MILES | 1 hr 27 min | by Michael Stern

Hash (on rice) is the star side-dish at barbecue parlors throughout South Carolina. A byproduct of whole-hog cookery, it is made mostly from viscera and can vary from soup-loose to stew-chunky. It delivers intense barbecue flavor, but beyond that dreamy duet of swine and smoke, it can vary from relish-sweet to savagely peppery. True Barbecue of Columbia claims to serve the world’s best, which is a boast we wouldn’t debate; but the great cauldrons of hash made at Hite’s Bar-B-Que and the Red Shed Diner & Produce (both available weekends only) belong in the Pantheon, too. Jackie Hite’s version is butter-rich; the hash at Maurice’s Piggy Park is dramatically smoky.

Driving Tour

151 MILES | 2 hr 56 min | by Michael Stern

The drive north from Milwaukee is a grand taste of Wisconsin. First stop: Sheboygan, renowned for its butchers’ brats (rhymes with hots, short for bratwurst), cooked over charcoal at the Charcoal Inn. In Manitowoc, Beerntsen’s Confectionery cooks candy in vintage copper kettles and hand-dips toffee, turtles, and chocolate-coated sugar puffs (known as fairy food). Wisconsin’s signature butter burger is nowhere more buttery than at Basil’s II; and up in Green Bay, Packers fans love Kroll’s West just across from Lambeau Field for its huge, messy, half-pound butter burgers. Up in Door County, enjoy the unique local meal known as a fish boil at the White Gull Inn, complete with bonfire and strolling accordionist … and, of course, cherry pie for dessert.

Driving Tour

2 MILES | 14 min | by Michael Stern

Montreal is home to a rich lode of Jewish food (kosher and not), ranging from the city’s unique and justly famous bagels (at St. Viateur) to Canada’s own version of pastrami, known as smoked meat, served in raffish deli style at Schwartz’s. You’ll find superb babkas and ruggelah at Cheskie’s Bakery, and and one of the finest steak dinners in North America at Moishes, where side dishes include marvelous latkes (potato pancakes) and meals begin with chopped liver or herring in cream sauce. No culinary visit to La Métropole would be complete without a baloney & salami sandwich at Wilensky’s Light Lunch and a kitchen sink “Mish Mash” omelet at Beauty’s Luncheonette.

Driving Tour

283 MILES | 4 hr 23 min | by Michael Stern

Five destination eateries across Kansas, all within minutes of Interstate 70. Heading east to west, we bid adieu to Kansas City with breakfast at Niecie’s, which opens at 5:30am to serve soulful biscuits and gravy, pancakes, and chicken and waffles. Stop at Porubsky’s Grocery in Topeka for cold-weather chili with nose-tingling horseradish pickles and at the Cozy Inn in Salina for a half dozen or more itty-bitty, pickle-topped burgers, served by the joint that invented the slider (in 1922). Two legendary chicken dinner restaurants line the route: the Brookville Hotel in Abeline and Al’s Chickenette out west in Hays.