Indian Pass Raw Bar

Oyster Bar | Seafood
Memorable
One of the best
Save

Starting in 1929 as the commissary for a turpentine factory, the Indian Pass Raw Bar has earned a gleaming reputation among locals, sunbirds, and travelers — for oysters, of course, shucked to order just behind the counter. Deep-cupped Apalachicolas are nothing short of magnificent eaten raw from the half shell, each a fine mouthful glistening with oceanic liquor, painfully tender, ocean-sweet, overwhelmingly satisfying. (But buoyant enough that I easily dispatched a dozen in about 90 seconds.)

I would have had another raw dozen or more, but duty demanded I also sample baked oysters, a specialty in oyster bars all along the Forgotten Coast. Oh, lordy, they are scrumptious, baked only long enough for the marine meat to warm abut not toughen or dry, and for all the butter, Parmesan cheese, and garlic on top to melt into a luxurious golden veil.

Smoked fish dip, a panhandle passion, is here creamy with the sweetest possible duet of smoke and fresh fish. Also notable are gorgeous pink peel & eat seasoned steamed shrimp, simple comfort-food seafood gumbo, and classic Key lime pie. For seafood frowners, there is a short menu of burgers, hot dogs, and BBQ.

Seating is a commissary-style tables and service is the charming antiquated method by which customers check off what they want on a paper menu and hand that menu to a waitress. Decor is a wildly eclectic mise-en-scene that includes dollar bills plastered everywhere on the wall and a map of the U.S.A. with pushpins showing where customers have come from.

What to Eat
Indian Pass Raw Bar, Baked Oysters
Baked Oysters
Must-Try
Baked oysters are freighted with Parmesan cheese, butter, and garlic, baked only long enough for the oysters to warm but still retain all their sensuous succulence.
Indian Pass Raw Bar, Raw Oysters
Raw Oysters
Must-Try
Nearby Apalachicola calls itself the oyster capital of the world. Slide a few dozen of these beauties down your throat and it is easy to see why.
Indian Pass Raw Bar, Key Lime Pie
Key Lime Pie
Must-Try
With its rugged, buttery Graham cracker crust and filling as rich as Devonshire cream, Key lime pie strikes just the right balance between tart and sweet.
Indian Pass Raw Bar, Smoked Fish Dip
Smoked Fish Dip
Must-Try
Smoked fish dip is a passion served in nearly every oyster bar and eatery along the coast. Indian Pass's version is one of the best: creamy, smoky, ocean sweet.
Indian Pass Raw Bar, Seafood Gumbo
Seafood Gumbo
Mild, comfort-food gumbo
Directions and Hours
open now
SundayCLOSED
MondayCLOSED
Tuesday12 pm - 9 pm
Wednesday12 pm - 9 pm
Thursday12 pm - 9 pm
Friday12 pm - 9 pm
Saturday12 pm - 9 pm
Roadtrips
This restaurant is featured in the following eating tours.
7 stops | 154 MILES | 3 hr 14 min

Route 98 east of Panama City and south of Tallahassee borders what is known as Florida's Big Bend because it is shaped like the one in Texas. But unlike desert land west of the Pecos, Florida's Big Bend is lush: cool blue waters of Apalachee Bay to the south and Spanish moss-draped forest on the…

8 stops | 89 MILES | 1 hr 58 min

Traveling along Florida's Forgotten Coast is a reminder of what the Sunshine State was like several million inhabitants ago. The drive is unspoiled two-lane magic -- blue Gulf waters on one side, Spanish moss-draped forest on the other, and quiet small towns all along the way. With Apalachicola ("Oyster Capital of the World") at its…

6 stops | 268 MILES | 5 hr 9 min

Apalachicola, Florida to Mobile, Alabama

Roadfood Adventures are not just quests for great food wherever the road leads, but an invitation for travelers to connect that memorable food to the land, to its history and culture,…

Information
Price
$$
Seasons
Open Year Round
Meals Served
Lunch, Dinner
Credit Cards Accepted
Yes
Alcohol Served
Yes
Outdoor Seating
No
Website

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