Boss Oyster

Oyster Bar | Seafood
Memorable
One of the best
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**** SPRING, 2019: BOSS OYSTER IS CLOSED DUE TO HURRICANE DAMAGE ****

To bivalve-loving epicureans, the name Apalachicola is a siren song. Deep-cupped oysters, harvested from the fresh/saltwater mix where the Apalachicola River flows into the Gulf of Mexico, are unique for buttery meatiness that sparkles raw, baked, broiled, or fried. In the town of Apalachicola, a great place to savor the bounty is the suitably named Boss Oyster. While the natural harvest has suffered in recent years due to a dearth of freshwater flow, oyster season remains a big deal in this restaurant, which boasts that it owns the only refrigerated oyster boats in the state. So, even if they’re not from right here, you can be sure they’re fresh. The raw ones I ate in the fall at the beginning of oyster season were spectacularly bright and briny. I ordered a half dozen, but was given eight because three were on the small side.

When the big oysters get fried, each is a great mouthful that is lusciousness incarnate, enveloped in a thick, spicy coat of gold. They’re also available steamed or baked, or gilded with Thai chili, wasabi and ginger, or flying fish roe. If you are allergic to oysters, we recommend “Grand Grits” – cheese grits topped with cream sauce, tasso ham, and shrimp so juicy that they are a revelation for those of us accustomed to wooden, pale-flavored ones. The grits themselves are creamy, rich, buttery, and mild, a fine platform for the wonderful shrimp.

Aside from its totally local menu, Boss Oyster is notable for its setting at the water’s edge with tables that provide a great view as well as the briny scent of Gulf waters. The deck is outfitted with signs warning, “Please do not feed the birds”; and despite wooden scarecrow owls perched along the rail, if you sit at an al fresco picnic table, you can expect an audience of gulls perched on nearby pilings.

What to Eat
Boss Oyster, Oyster Po Boy
Oyster Po Boy
Must-Try
The oysters in the po boy are huge. The bread isn't interesting, so I just plucked these up and ate them as finger food.
Boss Oyster, Oysters on the Half Shell (6)
Oysters on the Half Shell (6)
Must-Try
An appetizer of six oysters turned out to be eight, the shucker having decided that a lagniappe of two was in order.
Boss Oyster, Grand Grits
Grand Grits
Must-Try
'Grand Grits': Shrimp and tasso ham cosseted in cream sauce that floods over a bowl full of buttery cheese grits.
Boss Oyster, Char-Grilled Oysters
Char-Grilled Oysters
Must-Try
The fire & ocean aroma of char-grilled oysters is deliriously appetizing.
Boss Oyster, Grilled Shrimp
Grilled Shrimp
Must-Try
Firm and ocean-sweet grilled shrimp are easy to eat by the dozen.
Directions and Hours
closed now
Sunday11:30 am - 9 pm
Monday11:30 am - 9 pm
Tuesday11:30 am - 9 pm
Wednesday11:30 am - 9 pm
Thursday11:30 am - 9 pm
Friday11:30 am - 9 pm
Saturday11:30 am - 9 pm
Roadtrips
This restaurant is featured in the following eating tours.
7 stops | 154 MILES | 3 hr 14 min

Route 98 east of Panama City and south of Tallahassee borders what is known as Florida's Big Bend because it is shaped like the one in Texas. But unlike desert land west of the Pecos, Florida's Big Bend is lush: cool blue waters of Apalachee Bay to the south and Spanish moss-draped forest on the…

8 stops | 89 MILES | 1 hr 58 min

Traveling along Florida's Forgotten Coast is a reminder of what the Sunshine State was like several million inhabitants ago. The drive is unspoiled two-lane magic -- blue Gulf waters on one side, Spanish moss-draped forest on the other, and quiet small towns all along the way. With Apalachicola ("Oyster Capital of the World") at its…

6 stops | 67 MILES | 1 hr 27 min

Big Bend Coastal Trail

Florida's Big Bend Coastal trail is a "rich heritage [of] barrier islands, sand dunes, beaches, bays, coastal marshes, and springs," as described by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation. For seekers of Roadfood -- seafood in particular -- it is one of the most rewarding byways in the nation.

Apalachicola

6 stops | 268 MILES | 5 hr 9 min

Apalachicola, Florida to Mobile, Alabama

Roadfood Adventures are not just quests for great food wherever the road leads, but an invitation for travelers to connect that memorable food to the land, to its history and culture,…

Information
Price
$
Seasons
Open Year Round
Meals Served
Lunch, Dinner
Credit Cards Accepted
Yes
Alcohol Served
Yes
Outdoor Seating
Yes
Website

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